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AVIVA

Vocalist Aviva (Audrey Babcock) is a dynamic up-and-coming mezzo-soprano. She has won awards from the Metropolitan Opera, the George London Foundation, Opera Index, the Sullivan Foundation, and the Lotte Lenya Foundation. In addition to signature roles as Carmen, Aldonza/Dulcinea, Dalilah, and Lucretia, she also premiered the title role in Tobias Picker's Thérèse Raquin in New York City and was named "artist of the year" by Syracuse Opera for her portrayal of Jo in Mark Adamo's Little Women.

Her extensive work in crossover material has brought her voice to the screen in scores for films Asylum Seekers, Suenos, and Dark Angel, as well to the theater with her one-woman show Lily; her life his music, a gritty tale written by Ms. Babcock, and based on the music of Kurt Weill.

Her debut album Songs For Carmen is sung in Ladino, a form of ancient Spanish spoken by the Jewish people of Spain. A fusion of Flamenco, Classical, Electronic, and Arabic music, Songs For Carmen, is inspired by the mythical Sephardic woman, made famous by George Bizet’s internationally acclaimed opera, Carmen.
AVIVA AND DAN: BEYOND CARMEN

Aviva also performs around the world with multi-faceted New York guitarist, Dan Nadel. Known as Aviva and Dan, their signature shows, Beyond Carmen and Hot Songs for Cold Nights, are filled with passionate music and steeped in Spanish and Mediterranean influence. Their repertoire spans time and styles -- medieval to modern, classical to flamenco.  They explore new arrangements of music from Brazil, Spain, Israel, Argentina and France, as well as the melancholic romances of the Sephardim. 
DAN NADEL

A graduate of the Jazz program at the New School in New York City, Dan Nadel’s unique approach to the guitar combines jazz, flamenco, pop, and classical sensibilities. In addition to Aviva, Dan has recorded and performed with artists Gabrielle Stravelli, Harel Shachal, Satoshi Takeishi, Dave Liebman, Chico Freeman, Leo Gandelman, Lonnie Plaxico, and film composer, David Majzlin.